THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN WINNING AND LOSING IN SILAT 28th 2015 SEA GAMES SINGAPORE (INDONESIA: CLASS A AND D)


Shapie, M.N.M (1,2) & Dzarul Izzaidie, D.I. (1)

1.Fakulti Sains Sukan dan Rekreasi, Universiti Teknologi MARA, 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor.




ABSTRACT
The purpose of this study is to describe the accuracy among Indonesian Silat’s team during Sea Games 2015. A video recording during the match was use for the analysis. A video recording during the match was used for the analysis. The skills were coded into categories which are punches, kick, sweep, dodge, catch, fake punches/fake kicks and topple down. By using sample t-test used to analyses the data between winner and loser. Result shows that the winner used kicking, sweep and topple down techniques compared to the loser.

INTRODUCTION
            Silat is the essence of combat and self-defense, the true fighting application of the techniques. Silat is part of martial arts from Malaysia, Singapore, Indonesia, Philippines, Thailand and Brunei. It played an important role in the history and culture of Malaysian and Indonesian people. Silat should be learn from younger ages so they could use silat as protection. Silat is widely known through much of South East Asia, the term pencak silat is used mainly in Indonesia.
            According to Widiastuti (2014), one of pencak silat course goals is to improve students skills. One of learning process is game approach which is it involve exciting, fun, and motivating for students. It creates involvement of students in the class, larger excitement to improve and study new advanced skills, and motivating the students to perform well in class.
There is a lot of motion analysis of silat including punch, kick, block, sweep, topple, and dodge. Previous study has been studied about the activity profile during action time. According to Mohamed Shapie, Oliver, O’Donoghue, and Tong (2013) the nature of work periods within any combat sports depends on the frequency, volume and type of the activity being performed. The objective of this study is to describe the skills involved between the winner and loser as well as to determine the factor that influences the winner to win.


MOVEMENT CATEGORIES
Punch: The punch ‘tumbuk’ attack is done by a hand with a closed fist hitting the target.
Kick: The kick ‘tendang’ is an attacking movement which is performed with one leg or two legs simultaneously a kick can be aimed at any target.
Block: The blocking movements using arms, elbows and legs with the purpose to block off or striking back at any attack.
Catch: The catch ‘tangkapan’ is done by using the hand to obstruct the opponent from carrying out an attack.
Topple: There are various ways of toppling down one’s opponent. For example, a silat exponent ‘pesilat’ can either push or shove.
Sweep: Swiping ‘sapuan’ involves attacking an opponent leg.
           

MATERIALS AND METHODS

                Analysis has been done with a video recording of Class A and D Men’s final matches during Sea Games in Singapore 2015. Two competitors are involved from different team or country. This match consists of three rounds, which is two minute per round and one-minute rest between each round. This notation involved various skills such as punch, kick, block, catch, topple and sweep. Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) is used to calculate the statistical analysis and result. The video is repeated at least two times so the data can be taken properly. The frequency was taken as data to be analyzed.




STATISTICAL ANALYSIS AND RESULT


1.      Men’s Class A Indonesia Versus Singapore (Indonesia won)
Various Skill and Outcome

Group
N
Mean
Std. Deviation
Std. Error Mean
Score
INDO
3
19.6667
16.56301
9.56266
SIN
3
20.6667
4.61880
2.66667

TABLE 1


HIT TARGET
HIT ELSEWHERE
MISS OPPONENT
TOTAL
INDONESIA
37
4
18
59
SINGAPORE
26
18
18
62

2.      Men’s Class A Indonesia Versus Philippines (Indonesia won)
Various Skills and Outcome

Group
N
Mean
Std. Deviation
Std. Error Mean
Score
INDO
3
16.3333
15.37314
8.87568
PHI
3
15.3333
4.16333
2.40370

TABLE 2


HIT TARGET
HIT ELSEWHERE
MISS OPPONENT
TOTAL
INDONESIA
34
9
6
49
PHILIPPINES
12
20
14
46






3.      Men’s Class D Indonesia Versus Thailand (Indonesia Lost)

Varios Skills and Outcome

Group
N
Mean
Std. Deviation
Std. Error Mean
Score
INDO
3
32.3333
7.09460
4.09607
THAI
3
35.0000
23.64318
13.65040

TABLE 3


HIT TARGET
HIT ELSEWHERE
MISS OPPONENT
TOTAL
INDONESIA
40
31
26
97
THAILAND
62
32
13
107


4.      Men’s Class A Indonesia Versus Vietnam (Indonesia Lost)
Various Skills and Outcome

Group
N
Mean
Std. Deviation
Std. Error Mean
Score
INDO
3
25.3333
15.69501
9.06152
VIE
3
22.6667
11.15049
6.43774

TABLE 4


HIT TARGET
HIT ELSEWHERE
MISS OPPONENT
TOTAL
INDONESIA
13
20
43
76
VIETNAM
10
27
31
68







DISCUSSION
            As the result, we can see that both Men’s Class A Indonesia vs Singapore and Philippines won the game. From Table 1, Indonesia has advantage with their hit target on their opponent with 37 direct hits. From Table 2, Indonesia massively scores 34 direct hits while Philippines only manage to do 12 hits.
Another factor that leads to the win of Indonesia is by their accuracy of dodging/evading. This statement can be proved from Table 2 that Indonesia only missed their attacking by 6 while Philippines score 14. From Table 3 and Table 4, Indonesia has lost the match. According to Table 3, Indonesia is lacking on direct hit to their opponent (Thailand). They only score 40 hits while Thailand overpowers them with 62 hits. For this match, Indonesia also makes error with their missed target on their opponent. The score was 26. 

CONCLUSION
            In conclusion, Indonesia’s team presented a good performance for all matches especially for category Men’s Class A. They claim the winning by having a good accuracy on delivering direct hits to their opponent. Plus, they also make less hit elsewhere and focusing more on direct hits.
According to all the video, Indonesia’s team more likely use sweep in their match especially for Class A. We can see from the result that during the match against Singapore and Philippines, the athletes have the high potential of using dodge and catch. For Class D, Indonesia should increase their accuracy on blowing direct hits and decrease miss target on opponent. Class D also uses less blocking and that costs the competitor to receive more punches and kicks.

RECOMMENDATION
            I would recommend silat athletes to practice more on their target and technique to improve their performance especially on catch, dodge, punch, kick, sweep, and topple. To be a very capable and good silat athlete, we must train longer to improve the technique and enhance the level of performance. Not just that, video analysis also can be a guidance to identify the athlete’s mistake, so that repairmen can be done to help for the upcoming events.


REFERENCES

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3.      Widiastuti, W. (2014). Using game approach in improving learning outcomes of pencak silat. Asian Social Science, 10(5), 168.
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10.  Parnabas, V., Shapie, M. N. M., & Parnabas, J. (2015). Level of drugs usage and sport performance in malay silat. Ido Movement for Culture. Journal of Martial Arts Anthropology, 15(2), 45-51.

11.  Shapie, M. N. M., Oliver, J., O’Donoghue, P., & Tong, R. (2014). Fitness characteristics of youth silat performers. Journal of Sports Science and Medicine, 1, 147-155.
12.  Pencak Silat Tanding Men's Class A Final INA vs VIE (Day 9) - 28th SEA Games Singapore 2015 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TogWi7jsKcU&t=25s
13.  Pencak Silat Men's Tanding Class A Semi-Final PHI vs INA (Day 8) | 28th SEA Games Singapore 2015 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s5JphsM7YiU
14.  Pencak Silat Tanding Category Indonesia vs Singapore (Day 6) | 28th SEA Games Singapore 2015                  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VdKHSsMioug
15.  Pencak Silat Tanding Men's Class D Semi-Final THAI vs INA(Day 8) | 28th SEA Games Singapore 2015 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=38l1L7K_Bf0&t=83s




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